"A wonderfully expressive singer with a thrillingly unforced sound." - The Arts Desk
"A delight with his honeyed, even tone and faultless phrasing." - The Guardian
"An astonishingly beautiful voice and is on his way to greatness." - The Guardian
"He presents Onegin as one dreams of hearing and seeing him … with such allure as to make clear why such a ripe and ready girl as Tatyana would fall so helplessly in love." - Music OMH
Press

“In a coup of luxury casting, considering the role’s brevity, Andrei Bondarenko makes for a resplendent Robert, easily the equal of Dmitri Hvorostovsky on Valery Gergiev’s Philips recording.”

“Refreshingly young in the role (and why not?), Bondarenko makes as convincing a sexual predator as he does a hunter… As a singer he’s world-class, clear as a bell with beautifully focussed creamy tone and a vocal virility to match his libido. His ‘jealousy’ aria is textbook.”

“Bondarenko, winner of the Song prize at Cardiff this year, has an astonishingly beautiful voice and is on his way to greatness if this is anything to go by.”

“The young Bolkonsky of Andrei Bondarenko expresses his nobility both through his singing and his acting … the scene of his farewell to life with its famous ‘piti-piti’ ostinatos was flawlessly sung.”

“It was clear at the 2011 Cardiff Singer of the World (he deservedly ran away with the Song Prize) that he is a wonderfully expressive singer with a thrillingly unforced sound. What you could only guess at in competition was that he can really act. … Bondarenko never looks like he’s trying and that lack of strain makes him completely engaging. He never indulges in scene-stealing but it’s hard not to prefer watching him and listening to the sheer richness of his lush baritone sound.”

“But most striking of all is Andrei Bondarenko … an artist in the making. His Malatesta – a vividly impersonated con man – was sung with both seductive charm and a coolly sinister edge. Bondarenko returns to Glyndebourne next summer to sing Marcello in La Bohème: remember his name, as I guess he is going places.”

“As Natasha and Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, Aida Garifullina and Andrei Bondarenko impress as major new talents… The reunion of Natasha and the dying Andrei, in which they recount their lost love, is devastating.”

“Andrei Bondarenko is perfect for the role of Onegin … he presents Onegin as one dreams of hearing and seeing him – here is the bored, listless dandy, quite insouciant about the simply ghastly necessity of visiting the sick or existing anywhere out of town – the Vronsky figure to the life, and singing for the most part with such allure as to make clear why such a ripe and ready girl as Tatyana would fall so helplessly in love.”

“Pelleas (Andrei Bondarenko) exudes immaturity and youthful innocence, while revealing a sensual potential that creates a tangible tension on stage from his first encounter with Melisande.”

“The Slavonic tones of the principal singers make a significant difference to this Onegin – best of all in the two scenes where Andrei Bondarenko’s Onegin and Ekaterina Scherbachenko’s Tatyana confront each other. Both sing with poise, focus and uncommon elegance: everything is internalised, and we hang on their every word.”

“Backed by the choir, the fluid and beautifully poised baritone of the 2011 BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition winner Andrei Bondarenko always made pleasant listening, even when he cried ‘Kill, kill the betrayer!'”

“Baritone Andrei Bondarenko superbly authoritative in the final poem on funeral bell.”

“Andrei Bondarenko’s Dr Malatesta communicates insinuating persuasiveness in a wonderfully rich and even baritone.”

“The baritone Andrei Bondarenko, who won the song prize at Cardiff Singer of the World in 2011, is a delight with his honeyed, even tone and faultless phrasing.”

“Andrei Bondarenko won a song prize at the Cardiff Singer of the Year 2011. An extremely fine baritone, his phrasing, dynamics and velvety tone are a delight.”